Current Winter Reads

My resolution for the last year has been continuously reading. Which means that every night I read for at least thirty minutes. This year I resolved to start adding in weekend reading, which means every time during the day on a weekend that I go to grab my iPad or phone, I instead grab a book. Which means I’ve read quite a few books over the past two months! This post is as much for me as anyone else, because I forget what I’ve read and will go to read a book again multiple times (for example, Delicious! A book by Ruth Reichl that I almost bought this past week. Yup, I’ve already read it). Here is my quick review of the books.

The Giver of Stars: I don’t know if this was the actual intent of the story, but what I really enjoyed about this book was the drive of the characters to bring education to rural areas. Through treacherous conditions, difficult antagonists, and class related struggles, the main characters worked to create a real moving library in Kentucky. And it’s based on a true story!

Messenger of Truth: While each Maisie Dobbs book has an element of mystery, what I’ve enjoyed even more is the scope of understanding that Jacqueline Winspear brings to the time period of the stories. Each story is connected to the next, and you see the characters triumph and also fall in different ways as they deal with the aftermath of The Great War.

An Incomplete Revenge: Continuing with what I said before about Maisie Dobbs books, this story shows the stereotyping and fear that can come from wars and the ramifications and devastation of those fears. I was honestly shocked about the turn of events in this one.

Bangkok Wakes to Rain: A novel that interweaves multiple stories that almost seem like separate short soliloquies, but they eventually start running closer and closer together until you have the singular conclusion. I had a little trouble following it at certain points, but it was an incredibly unique read.

Conviction: I read this so fast, because I had to find out what happened at the end! The main character is incredibly flawed, but embraces the flaws so relentlessly that you root for her to figure out the mystery and to make it to the other side.

From Scratch: A Memoir of Love, Sicily, and Finding Home: I was worried that this book was going to be incredibly sad, but at the end I felt incredibly uplifted. The sense of peace that the author not only found, but creates through the true story will stay with you a long time after you read it. I could honestly read it again.

The Last House Guest: A mystery that cuts back and forth from a year earlier and then present day, the main character tries to piece together the death of her friend, while also trying to overcome her struggles in a small town that she can’t seem to leave.

The Great Alone: This is one you’ll want to set aside a long time to read. It’s long. It’s at times, tiring. I may have skipped to the end to see if the characters were going to come out on the other side of the enormous walls they were up against. It is definitely an investment of time, but it is worth it. Kristin Hannah creates characters so intricately that you not only become invested, but you seek to understand who they are from the beginning to the end.

You may also like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *